MIDI-Cables

The MIDI standard (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was developed in the 1980s as a means to link up two (or more synthesizers) digitally. It also allows you to send and receive parameter changes, which also makes it interesting for guitar-related products. At the moment, MIDI enjoys something of a second coming in guitar rigs, thanks to the abundance of digital effects and digitally-controlled amp switching. The MIDI protocol allows you to transmit on 16 channels simultaneously, with up to 128 different commands per channel. In practice this means that you can use Programme Change-commands (PCs in short) to change a digital multi-effect unit’s patches, while you can use Control Change-commands (CCs) to change effect parameters on-the-fly. Both types of commands can be send and received at the same time in each channel.

MIDI-devices can be daisy-chained, and each unit is numbered according to its placing in this chain. You use a five-pin DIN-cable to plug into a MIDI IN-port, and use the MIDI THRU- or MIDI OUT-port to send the MIDI-stream on to the next device. Then you have to assign a MIDI-channel for each device; channel 1 could be a digital delay, while channel 2 might be a reverb unit, and channel 3 might control a digital amp-switcher.

Often you need to send MIDI-commands from your pedalboard to a rack near the backline. We carry special MIDI-cables for this purpose, with lengths of six to ten metres. Read more in the Cable looms DIY -section. Silly as it seems, but MIDI devices don’t always place their MIDI-ports in the same order or in convenient places. Our newest Custom Boards MIDI-patch cables are made specially for us, and they feature turnable MIDI-plugs, allowing you to integrate MIDI-devices even under the most crammed conditions.

10 Item(s)

per page

10 Item(s)

per page